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Will Swtor be Windows 11 compatible?


TrixxieTriss

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Microsoft have announced that Windows 11 will be a free upgrade this fall. So that’s only a few months away.

Can anyone at BioWare confirm that swtor will work with Windows 11 and they have a team working to test compatibility issues before players start upgrading?

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I wouldn't get my hopes up about it. Considering the track record here EA/BioWare will probably either let the game finally die or barely put any effort into making it compatible. Hell, I wouldn't be surprised if that's what they've had the ten or so Devs left on the SWTOR team working on.
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I wouldn't get my hopes up about it. Considering the track record here EA/BioWare will probably either let the game finally die or barely put any effort into making it compatible. Hell, I wouldn't be surprised if that's what they've had the ten or so Devs left on the SWTOR team working on.

 

32 bit games and software are supposed to be able to work on Windows 11. So technically it shouldn’t be an issue.

But it would be nice if someone at BioWare downloaded Windows 11 and tested it to make sure before Microsoft push it out to people with little to no tech back ground.

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Personally I'm not going to bother with jumping into Windows 11 right away. I kind of equate it to ... playing new SWTOR content on day one. It'll probably be buggy and full of crashes. I'll wait until things get smoothed over a little bit first. By the time I think about making the switch I'll know whether or not SWTOR will run well.
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I don’t think it will be an issue seeing as they are already bringing in a ton of older games to the new Xbox some as old as the first Xbox. What worry’s me more about windows 11 is “if” Everything will be on a subscription base or micro transaction and nothing makes me more irate after getting a product everything is paywall after paying for it. Yeah I know SWTOR is sort of like that but I was fortunate enough to get all The unlocks here and more just by playing the game and not spending more than I needed for items. So in that regards a subscription for me for what I enjoy is optional…
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Personally I'm not going to bother with jumping into Windows 11 right away. I kind of equate it to ... playing new SWTOR content on day one. It'll probably be buggy and full of crashes. I'll wait until things get smoothed over a little bit first. By the time I think about making the switch I'll know whether or not SWTOR will run well.

 

Yeah, Im the same. But it’s I’ve also come from a tech support background and I can already imagine the drama posts on the forums because people upgraded to Windows 11 without considering if swtor will work properly. Then they blame BioWare for not making it work.

 

All I’m suggesting is BioWare do some testing and tell us if there are problems before players go ahead and do it without thinking. If there are problems and BioWare make a big post to say swtor isn’t supported under Windows 11.

Then players know in advance not to upgrade or if they do, it will be up to them and not BioWare to make it work.

It covers Biowares arse and at the same time reduced a lot of potential community rage issues that may crop up because of it.

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i and everyone else who knows how to use a computer will upgrade to windows 11 and load up swtor without issue, guaranteed, there is no question or doubt in the matter whatsoever.

There most certainly *is* a doubt. Until BioWare tries SWTOR on prerelease versions of Windows 11, they don't *know* that it will work without changes, so there's a doubt. It's a new version of Windows, so there is a doubt that everything that SWTOR does will "just work".

 

Ultimately, if something about your software or its environment (e.g. the OS underneath it) changes, you test it, because until you do, you have to treat it as fatally broken. Who knows, maybe it *will* just work, but until you test it, you won't know.

 

My background: I've worked as a developer since the beginning of 1989, and I did some "summer job" developer work before that. There are more PCs than people at my home at the moment (like five for each human), and when you add the two Raspberry Pi 3B+es and a firewall(1), and all the rest, the ratio is slightly ridiculous.

 

1998 brought the imminent arrival of the first versions of Windows 98, and I was working on a product for Windows 95. My company joined the 98 beta program to make sure my stuff would continue to work (it did, but we didn't know until I tried it), and I was in the top 8% of people reporting Win98Beta bugs to Microsoft. Um. I reported three bugs, and that got me in the top 8%...

 

The key point, though, is that we didn't know our product would work until we tried it, so we tried it. BioWare should be doing the same. (I don't know for sure, but I expect they did it back when, during the run-ups to Windows 8 and 8.1 and 10 and 10 Creator's and ....)

 

(1) A free-standing firewall in a box of its own inside my network, not a minor software module inside endpoints. It picks up all manner of goofy stuff, notably that the CDN used by Steam for the store pages doesn't follow the HTTP RFCs, which left my Steam client showing blank pages in the store until I fixed up special filtering rules to disable the alarm in question just for them. (Their own advice is to turn off stateful inspection for all connections to anything Steam. No, not happening, guys.) I have the firewall because I work for the company that makes it.

Edited by SteveTheCynic
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There most certainly *is* a doubt. Until BioWare tries SWTOR on prerelease versions of Windows 11, they don't *know* that it will work without changes, so there's a doubt. It's a new version of Windows, so there is a doubt that everything that SWTOR does will "just work".

 

Ultimately, if something about your software or its environment (e.g. the OS underneath it) changes, you test it, because until you do, you have to treat it as fatally broken. Who knows, maybe it *will* just work, but until you test it, you won't know.

 

My background: I've worked as a developer since the beginning of 1989, and I did some "summer job" developer work before that. There are more PCs than people at my home at the moment (like five for each human), and when you add the two Raspberry Pi 3B+es and a firewall(1), and all the rest, the ratio is slightly ridiculous.

 

1998 brought the imminent arrival of the first versions of Windows 98, and I was working on a product for Windows 95. My company joined the 98 beta program to make sure my stuff would continue to work (it did, but we didn't know until I tried it), and I was in the top 8% of people reporting Win968Beta bugs to Microsoft. Um. I reported three bugs, and that got me in the top 8%...

 

The key point, though, is that we didn't know our product would work until we tried it, so we tried it. BioWare should be doing the same. (I don't know for sure, but I expect they did it back when, during the run-ups to Windows 8 and 8.1 and 10 and 10 Creator's and ....)

 

This is what Trixxie was trying to say.

Edited by Totemdancer
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People have short memories, when windows 10 came out, a lot of people had issues upgrading to it, and playing here, and I know some had issues with 8/8.1 too.

 

It probably will work, and most people will be grand, but we all know, nothing is ever 100%, and people are going to have issues. Isn't it better that BW test this out before we do, and start having major headaches.

 

 

 

EDIT: There's also no need to be rude to someone, who hasn't been rude to you. Trixxie may lose her temper and be rude at times (very rarely) {we're all guilty of that} , but it's because someone attacks her first. And as the saying goes, if you poke the wookie, it's your fault if she rips your arm off ;)

Edited by DarkTergon
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There most certainly *is* a doubt. Until BioWare tries SWTOR on prerelease versions of Windows 11, they don't *know* that it will work without changes, so there's a doubt. It's a new version of Windows, so there is a doubt that everything that SWTOR does will "just work".

 

Ultimately, if something about your software or its environment (e.g. the OS underneath it) changes, you test it, because until you do, you have to treat it as fatally broken. Who knows, maybe it *will* just work, but until you test it, you won't know.

 

My background: I've worked as a developer since the beginning of 1989, and I did some "summer job" developer work before that. There are more PCs than people at my home at the moment (like five for each human), and when you add the two Raspberry Pi 3B+es and a firewall(1), and all the rest, the ratio is slightly ridiculous.

 

1998 brought the imminent arrival of the first versions of Windows 98, and I was working on a product for Windows 95. My company joined the 98 beta program to make sure my stuff would continue to work (it did, but we didn't know until I tried it), and I was in the top 8% of people reporting Win968Beta bugs to Microsoft. Um. I reported three bugs, and that got me in the top 8%...

 

The key point, though, is that we didn't know our product would work until we tried it, so we tried it. BioWare should be doing the same. (I don't know for sure, but I expect they did it back when, during the run-ups to Windows 8 and 8.1 and 10 and 10 Creator's and ....)

 

(1) A free-standing firewall in a box of its own inside my network, not a minor software module inside endpoints. It picks up all manner of goofy stuff, notably that the CDN used by Steam for the store pages doesn't follow the HTTP RFCs, which left my Steam client showing blank pages in the store until I fixed up special filtering rules to disable the alarm in question just for them. (Their own advice is to turn off stateful inspection for all connections to anything Steam. No, not happening, guys.) I have the firewall because I work for the company that makes it.

 

Exactly my points.

Win 11 “may” work out of the box. But that should never be considered a sure thing until a software company tests it. And this is something Bioware can do very easily to make sure there aren’t problems for paying customers.

Plus when you consider how many bugs this game has problems with, I would hope that Bioware would want to make sure any further development has no compatibility issues with Win 11.

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There most certainly *is* a doubt. Until BioWare tries SWTOR on prerelease versions of Windows 11, they don't *know* that it will work without changes, so there's a doubt. It's a new version of Windows, so there is a doubt that everything that SWTOR does will "just work".

 

Ultimately, if something about your software or its environment (e.g. the OS underneath it) changes, you test it, because until you do, you have to treat it as fatally broken. Who knows, maybe it *will* just work, but until you test it, you won't know.

 

My background: I've worked as a developer since the beginning of 1989, and I did some "summer job" developer work before that. There are more PCs than people at my home at the moment (like five for each human), and when you add the two Raspberry Pi 3B+es and a firewall(1), and all the rest, the ratio is slightly ridiculous.

 

1998 brought the imminent arrival of the first versions of Windows 98, and I was working on a product for Windows 95. My company joined the 98 beta program to make sure my stuff would continue to work (it did, but we didn't know until I tried it), and I was in the top 8% of people reporting Win968Beta bugs to Microsoft. Um. I reported three bugs, and that got me in the top 8%...

 

The key point, though, is that we didn't know our product would work until we tried it, so we tried it. BioWare should be doing the same. (I don't know for sure, but I expect they did it back when, during the run-ups to Windows 8 and 8.1 and 10 and 10 Creator's and ....)

 

(1) A free-standing firewall in a box of its own inside my network, not a minor software module inside endpoints. It picks up all manner of goofy stuff, notably that the CDN used by Steam for the store pages doesn't follow the HTTP RFCs, which left my Steam client showing blank pages in the store until I fixed up special filtering rules to disable the alarm in question just for them. (Their own advice is to turn off stateful inspection for all connections to anything Steam. No, not happening, guys.) I have the firewall because I work for the company that makes it.

 

decent points. if you haven't already though i suggest you do some research on windows 11 and how it differs from windows 10 then give your professional opinion regarding whether or not you think there might actually be some compatibility issues or not. i have already done quite a bit of my own research and like i already stated; from what i have read windows 11 is almost functionally identical to windows 10. almost the entirety of changes coming with windows 11 are asthetic changes + cleaning up the OS, there is absolutely nothing about them changing the way applications run. thus, there shouldn't be any difference between running the client on windows 10 and running it on windows 11.

 

if you can find some credible information that states otherwise though, i would concede that there might be some issues.

Edited by zerkington
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decent points. if you haven't already though i suggest you do some research on windows 11 and how it differs from windows 10 then give your professional opinion regarding whether or not you think there might actually be some compatibility issues or not. i have already done quite a bit of my own research and like i already stated; from what i have read windows 11 is almost functionally identical to windows 10. almost the entirety of changes coming with windows 11 are asthetic changes + cleaning up the OS, there is absolutely nothing about them changing the way applications run. thus, there shouldn't be any difference between running the client on windows 10 and running it on windows 11.

 

if you can find some credible information that states otherwise though, i would concede that there might be some issues.

Did you even understand my "decent points"? About how you don't know if it works unless you try? BioWare should be (and, quite frankly, probably *are*) testing SWTOR on pre-release Windows 11 so that they *know* that it works.

 

Ultimately, that's all that Trixxie was asking: have they done that testing? If they haven't, they don't know, and it's pretty much guaranteed that *something* will end badly for them. Maybe only in 0.1% of cases, but that's still a problem.

 

As for my professional opinion on the differences, life's too short for that junk, especially since to do it properly, I'd need a detailed list of what calls SWTOR makes to what parts of which WIndows APIs, and what has changed inside Windows for each of those calls, among other things. (Stupid stuff like "are they calling that API in a way that's slightly out of the documented spec, but it always worked, and now Win11 is more insistent that applications call it correctly so it breaks".)

 

Life's too short for that. I'll stick with "probably it will work, but BioWare should test it" combined with "probably it will just work, but it's hard to say how bad the bad thing would be, nor how probable it is without testing".

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https://www.xda-developers.com/windows-11-app-compatibility/amp/

 

this article validates what i am saying. as long as this holds true there should not be any compatibilty issues between windows 10 and 11; if it was capable of running on windows 10 it will run on windows 11.

It's short on substance and detail, and cites very little information as to *why* the author says what he says.

 

And of course Microsoft has a vested interest in preserving as much compatibility as possible, but the progressive pain for people trying to run older programs on recent versions of Windows (Bloodrayne, I'm looking at you(1)) suggests that the pain point is when applications are doing stuff that was outside what the APIs etc. said, but tolerated in earlier versions, but not tolerated in later versions.

 

Again, as a developer, you don't *know* if your application will work on release day unless you try it ahead of time.

 

(1) The original builds just plain don't work on recent versions of Windows, but Ziggurat got hold of the rights and the original studio, and the "Terminal Cut" version just works. In 4K/UHD, too. Warning: it's not a remaster, so it sill looks low-poly etc.

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Given the fact that the hardware requirements for Windows 11 seem to have been designed simply to facilitate the need for 90% (or more) current Windows 10 users to purchase a new computer I think I will give it a hard pass for now.

 

I do not expect there to be any issues with SWTOR running on Windows 11 though - however that is what the public beta will be for.

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Did you even understand my "decent points"? About how you don't know if it works unless you try? BioWare should be (and, quite frankly, probably *are*) testing SWTOR on pre-release Windows 11 so that they *know* that it works.

 

Ultimately, that's all that Trixxie was asking: have they done that testing? If they haven't, they don't know, and it's pretty much guaranteed that *something* will end badly for them. Maybe only in 0.1% of cases, but that's still a problem.

 

As for my professional opinion on the differences, life's too short for that junk, especially since to do it properly, I'd need a detailed list of what calls SWTOR makes to what parts of which WIndows APIs, and what has changed inside Windows for each of those calls, among other things. (Stupid stuff like "are they calling that API in a way that's slightly out of the documented spec, but it always worked, and now Win11 is more insistent that applications call it correctly so it breaks".)

 

Life's too short for that. I'll stick with "probably it will work, but BioWare should test it" combined with "probably it will just work, but it's hard to say how bad the bad thing would be, nor how probable it is without testing".

 

Well said. I had a reply, but you summed it up pretty well.

 

Basically we need Bioware to test it to make sure it works. Which is the premise for the thread.

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It's short on substance and detail, and cites very little information as to *why* the author says what he says.

 

And of course Microsoft has a vested interest in preserving as much compatibility as possible, but the progressive pain for people trying to run older programs on recent versions of Windows (Bloodrayne, I'm looking at you(1)) suggests that the pain point is when applications are doing stuff that was outside what the APIs etc. said, but tolerated in earlier versions, but not tolerated in later versions.

 

Again, as a developer, you don't *know* if your application will work on release day unless you try it ahead of time.

 

(1) The original builds just plain don't work on recent versions of Windows, but Ziggurat got hold of the rights and the original studio, and the "Terminal Cut" version just works. In 4K/UHD, too. Warning: it's not a remaster, so it sill looks low-poly etc.

 

Even the author on that website says “If you’re still running these legacy apps, they may not work on Windows 11

And considering swtor was designed to originally run on Windows XP, I would consider it a legacy app.

Edited by TrixxieTriss
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Did you even understand my "decent points"? About how you don't know if it works unless you try? BioWare should be (and, quite frankly, probably *are*) testing SWTOR on pre-release Windows 11 so that they *know* that it works.

 

Ultimately, that's all that Trixxie was asking: have they done that testing? If they haven't, they don't know, and it's pretty much guaranteed that *something* will end badly for them. Maybe only in 0.1% of cases, but that's still a problem.

 

As for my professional opinion on the differences, life's too short for that junk, especially since to do it properly, I'd need a detailed list of what calls SWTOR makes to what parts of which WIndows APIs, and what has changed inside Windows for each of those calls, among other things. (Stupid stuff like "are they calling that API in a way that's slightly out of the documented spec, but it always worked, and now Win11 is more insistent that applications call it correctly so it breaks".)

 

Life's too short for that. I'll stick with "probably it will work, but BioWare should test it" combined with "probably it will just work, but it's hard to say how bad the bad thing would be, nor how probable it is without testing".

 

yes, i understand precisely the points you are making. the issue is that as of currently there is absolutely no difference (no changes) to the way that windows 10 handles those calls and the way windows 11 is going to handle them; in this particular regard, windows 10 and windows 11 are exactly the same. this is why there are no forseen compatibility issues for anything that was capable of running on windows 10. are you understanding this point?

 

as long as the win 11 developers do not change any of the fuctions that you're addressing and leave it exactly the same as it is in windows 10 (as is currently the case), there won't be any compatibility issues at launch. because it will literally be exactly the same process as it is running it on windows 10.

 

tbh, i hope bioware does issue a statement regarding this. but if they do it will likely be something as mundane as "no, there will not be any compatibility issues". which will be for exactly the reasons i have given.

Edited by zerkington
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Even the author on that website says “If you’re still running these legacy apps, they may not work on Windows 11

And considering swtor was designed to originally run on Windows XP, I would consider it a legacy app.

 

you really have no idea what you're talking about. he's talking about apps that were specifically meant to run on windows xp, etc. basically apps that are 20+ years old and never updated to run on newer operating systems. the swtor client runs on windows 10, thus it will work on windows 11. he even specifically says you can test your old apps on windows 10, and if they work on windows 10, they will work on windows 11.

Edited by zerkington
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you really have no idea what you're talking about. he's talking about apps that were specifically meant to run on windows xp, etc. basically apps that are 20+ years old and never updated to run on newer operating systems. the swtor client runs on windows 10, thus it will work on windows 11. he even specifically says you can test your old apps on windows 10, and if they work on windows 10, they will work on windows 11.

 

Here’s the whole quote so people don’t think you are being misleading to off handedly troll trixxie.

 

Windows 10 was significantly different from these two and it removed some legacy components, which may have caused very old apps to stop working. If you’re still running these legacy apps, they may not work on Windows 11

 

You can’t tell from what the author wrote.

Edited by Totemdancer
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Any trouble you might have will come from running older versions of Windows, like Windows 7 or 8.1. Windows 10 was significantly different from these two and it removed some legacy components, which may have caused very old apps to stop working. If you’re still running these legacy apps, they may not work on Windows 11. A quick way to check though is to see if they work on Windows 10 right now. If you find one of your apps is broken and you need it, you may want to consider using a virtual machine to run the older versions of Windows.

 

everything points to Windows 11 running all the same apps as Windows 10. Microsoft hasn’t mentioned any changes to app compatibility. Plus, we’ve been testing the new OS extensively and we haven’t found any broken apps.

 

these are full quotes.

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Yeah, Im the same. But it’s I’ve also come from a tech support background and I can already imagine the drama posts on the forums because people upgraded to Windows 11 without considering if swtor will work properly. Then they blame BioWare for not making it work.

 

All I’m suggesting is BioWare do some testing and tell us if there are problems before players go ahead and do it without thinking. If there are problems and BioWare make a big post to say swtor isn’t supported under Windows 11.

Then players know in advance not to upgrade or if they do, it will be up to them and not BioWare to make it work.

It covers Biowares arse and at the same time reduced a lot of potential community rage issues that may crop up because of it.

 

Oh, yes BioWare should *definitely* test it out first no doubts there. I don't care how similar the two versions are supposed to be you don't just drop software into a new OS and *expect* it to run perfectly.

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