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For those who don’t plan to Upgrade your PC anytime soon.


CKNORTH

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So if anyone seems to be worried about running this game once Windows 11 hits but has no chance of upgrading there current systems. Yeah it might be 3 years away but windows tends to Bog down itself with a ton of updates till then. Anyhow if your simply think you can’t afford or otherwise don’t plan to upgrade. Here is the solution.

 

https://ubuntu.com/download/desktop

 

That is the Link to Ubuntu 20.04 what I usually do on a windows PC is once it’s downloaded mount the OS then copy and paste the contents into a formatted Fat32 USB. Then simply reboot hit F2 and boot from The USB and it will guide you through the installing process. Few things to note if Ubuntu scans the USB drive and finds errors in the files don’t worry. I found that there was 17 corrupted folders on mine. My solution was once Ubuntu was installed and updated. I downloaded it again formatted the USB again in Ubuntu with Fat32 and then used the create a bootable USB with Ubuntu’s format drive tool. You will have to format a second time. But when I did this there was 0 errors on the USB. This insures a clean install

 

If your plan is to game on your PC when installing use secondary drivers such as GPU and Wifi etc when it asks you. I had to tinker a bit with the Nvidia drivers but what worked at this point was the 440.

 

After you have done that and Ubuntu is updated. Install Steam from there App Store all apps are free. Once your logged in click on the steam link top left. Open settings select steam play select enable steam play for all titles for my PC I had to use Proton 5.13-6 for medium settings to run smoothly. Basically that is all you should need to do just install SWTOR and enjoy. I did manage to get other windows games to run even RuneScape Lol. I’ll list below my system specs.

 

Intel i5 processor

Nvidia 950 GPU

8GB Ram

500GB Kingston SSD

 

Played SWTOR for the past few hours and no issues thus far.

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I started reading whether Ubuntu supports NTFS partitions and got to this:

 

Now you have to find which partition is the NTFS one by using: sudo fdisk -l.

If your NTFS partition is for example /dev/sdb1 to mount it use: sudo mount -t ntfs -o nls=utf8,umask=0222 /dev/sdb1 /media/windows.

To unmount simply do: sudo umount /media/windows.

 

That got command line-ish way too fast.

 

Me and my 11 NTFS partitions, some of them on GPT-sectored drives rather than MBR:

https://i.postimg.cc/TPX7ZyKr/image.png

 

I'll stick to Windows.

Edited by xordevoreaux
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I started reading whether Ubuntu supports NTFS partitions and got to this:

 

 

 

That got command line-ish way too fast.

 

Me and my 11 NTFS partitions, some of them on GPT-sectored drives rather than MBR:

https://i.postimg.cc/TPX7ZyKr/image.png

 

I'll stick to Windows.

 

When you install Ubuntu it has an option to format to NTFS hmm I’ll see if I can somehow post a screenshot. In another post.

 

EDIT: so the next two links are photos of the way to partition the drive with the startup disk creation tool

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/191198068@N06/51271653041/in/dateposted-public/

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/191198068@N06/51272383634/in/dateposted-public/

 

so the second photo is the link to the creation tool when clicked you simply allocate how big of a partition you want to be for a windows OS NTFS etc. on the drive.

Edited by CKNORTH
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When you install Ubuntu it has an option to format to NTFS hmm I’ll see if I can somehow post a screenshot. In another post.

 

EDIT: so the next two links are photos of the way to partition the drive with the startup disk creation tool

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/191198068@N06/51271653041/in/dateposted-public/

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/191198068@N06/51272383634/in/dateposted-public/

 

so the second photo is the link to the creation tool when clicked you simply allocate how big of a partition you want to be for a windows OS NTFS etc. on the drive.

 

That partitioning in the top of the screen says Master Boot Record (MBR). Does it do GPT? And if it doesn't recognize GPT, it's already not worthwhile, and mounting / dismounting partitions as I mentioned is a command line chore.

 

Some people might scoff at me for avoiding command line entries, especially since back in the 80's I didn't have much choice with CP/M and DOS, but times have changed. If it's not point and click, it's in the garbage.

 

Thanks for the research.

Edited by xordevoreaux
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That partitioning in the top of the screen says Master Boot Record (MBR). Does it do GPT? And if it doesn't recognize GPT, it's already not worthwhile, and mounting / dismounting partitions as I mentioned is a command line chore.

 

Some people might scoff at me for avoiding command line entries, especially since back in the 80's I didn't have much choice with CP/M and DOS, but times have changed. If it's not point and click, it's in the garbage.

 

Thanks for the research.

 

Not going to lie Running Linux is a lot like working in a DOS OS you need to understand how to work for command lines. However a lot of this is explained with a simple search on google. And you simply just go line by line to copy and paste the commands all it takes is a bit of reading where to start from. It’s not difficult it’s just not spoon fed to you. But to each there own I suppose heh.

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