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Change in Voice Actor


BrutalAssailant

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I've found that when talking to the droid YD-33 on the Imperial Fleet (Supplies), the voice actor for the Sith Warrior is different. I mean...completely different. It's fairly clear that either Bioware used a temporary voice actor or Mark Bazeley started acting a different character. It's a pretty noticeable switch.

 

For those of you that are curious, you can check the difference by talking to C-06X, the flashpoint courier for Colicoid War Games who is right down the row from YD-33. I've gone back and forth between the two for about 10 minutes, and it's pretty clear that they are different voices. This is severely disappointing. I hope it's merely a temporary voice over.

 

Thoughts community? Thoughts Bioware?

Edited by BrutalAssailant
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Steve Valentine didn't voice the Sith Warrior, hard to believe because it sounds just like him, just like hard to believe the Bounty Hunter isn't Steve Blum, but Bioware used different voice actors.

 

Maybe I'm weird, but I don't think Mark Bazeley sounds like Steve Valentine at all, though I admit I've only heard Steve as he played Alistair in Dragon Age. I also don't think Steve Blum sounds like the BH. They both have that kind of rumbly scratchy sound in their voices, but that's the only similarity IMO.

Edited by Tamyn
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Personally I dislike the voice. British accents don't strike me as imposing the way a Sith Lord's voice should be. Glad I have a robotic voice filter on my helmet. Cannot stand the voice without it.

 

Because american accents sound so imposing.

 

Personally I adore the SW's voice actor, though I'm surpsied how intelligent it sounds for a brutish class.

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Because american accents sound so imposing.

 

Personally I adore the SW's voice actor, though I'm surpsied how intelligent it sounds for a brutish class.

 

I'd say James Earl Jones' voice was pretty imposing, as was Darth Malak's.

 

Palpatine was played by a British actor but you'll notice that when he's in his guise as the ambitious yet good hearted and caring senator/supreme chancellor, he speaks in his normal British accent. However when he more fully becomes Darth Sidious, he downplays his accent, using an "American accent", and sounds more imposing that way.

 

Remember that Darth Vader and Darth Maul were both physically portrayed by English actors/stuntmen, but both had their voices replaced to sound more evil and imposing. Most notably James Earl Jones being cast as Vader.

 

There is a subconscious association in American culture that has persisted since the Revolutionary war that British things are effeminate and/or pompous. Things like men drinking tea (some men do drink tea but it is not nearly as popular of a beverage among American men as it is men in other parts of the world), and the accent. During the build up to, and course of the Revolutionary war, there was a lot of hate towards anything British, and people connected these British things, like tea, to the British soldiers, who, fumbled about in the rugged American wilderness, and in doing so, looked inept and less "manly" to American militias. It's a subconscious cultural thing that at this point, many Americans still recognize these associations but don't know why, they don't know the historical context.

 

So when David Prowse was acting as Lord Vader on set, saying the lines, the American members of the cast and crew had trouble taking the villain seriously, because of his mild mannered British accent. Carrie Fisher referred to him as "Darth Farmer".

 

So.. raised in the US.. I hear a British accent, I think "pompous" before I can even consciously recognize it, and it doesn't make for an imposing villain.

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I'd say James Earl Jones' voice was pretty imposing, as was Darth Malak's.

 

Palpatine was played by a British actor but you'll notice that when he's in his guise as the ambitious yet good hearted and caring senator/supreme chancellor, he speaks in his normal British accent. However when he more fully becomes Darth Sidious, he downplays his accent, using an "American accent", and sounds more imposing that way.

 

Remember that Darth Vader and Darth Maul were both physically portrayed by English actors/stuntmen, but both had their voices replaced to sound more evil and imposing. Most notably James Earl Jones being cast as Vader.

 

There is a subconscious association in American culture that has persisted since the Revolutionary war that British things are effeminate and/or pompous. Things like men drinking tea (some men do drink tea but it is not nearly as popular of a beverage among American men as it is men in other parts of the world), and the accent. During the build up to, and course of the Revolutionary war, there was a lot of hate towards anything British, and people connected these British things, like tea, to the British soldiers, who, fumbled about in the rugged American wilderness, and in doing so, looked inept and less "manly" to American militias. It's a subconscious cultural thing that at this point, many Americans still recognize these associations but don't know why, they don't know the historical context.

 

So when David Prowse was acting as Lord Vader on set, saying the lines, the American members of the cast and crew had trouble taking the villain seriously, because of his mild mannered British accent. Carrie Fisher referred to him as "Darth Farmer".

 

So.. raised in the US.. I hear a British accent, I think "pompous" before I can even consciously recognize it, and it doesn't make for an imposing villain.

 

Most Impressive. lol

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There is a subconscious association in American culture that has persisted since the Revolutionary war that British things are effeminate and/or pompous. Things like men drinking tea (some men do drink tea but it is not nearly as popular of a beverage among American men as it is men in other parts of the world), and the accent. During the build up to, and course of the Revolutionary war, there was a lot of hate towards anything British, and people connected these British things, like tea, to the British soldiers, who, fumbled about in the rugged American wilderness, and in doing so, looked inept and less "manly" to American militias. It's a subconscious cultural thing that at this point, many Americans still recognize these associations but don't know why, they don't know the historical context.
What is this, I don't even...

 

I suppose your highschool History teacher would be proud of this answer, but no. Just no.

 

I see nothing accurate in this, except for the idea that some modern Americans today might view the British that way, which you are apparently an example of.

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Remember that Darth Vader and Darth Maul were both physically portrayed by English actors/stuntmen, but both had their voices replaced to sound more evil and imposing. Most notably James Earl Jones being cast as Vader.

 

Did Maul ever speak? I remember the Emperor talking TO him, but I don't really remember him saying anything in the movie. Just kinda standing there looking intimidating.

 

 

 

So.. raised in the US.. I hear a British accent, I think "pompous" before I can even consciously recognize it, and it doesn't make for an imposing villain.

 

 

Actually, Imperials are "British" and the accent sounds perfect for them. If a Grand Moff DIDN'T talk with a British accent, it would seem wrong. And Grand Moffs are as evil as they come.

 

But yes, the sith have a different thing going on than normal imperials.

 

That said, I love the voice of the SW, I think it fits great. I'm an evil sith warrior maniac on a killing rampage, but I still have some intelligence and culture.

Edited by miliways
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Did Maul ever speak? I remember the Emperor talking TO him, but I don't really remember him saying anything in the movie. Just kinda standing there looking intimidating.

 

He has 2 lines:

At last we will reveal ourselves to the Jedi. At last we will have revenge.

 

and this, which I would prefer to ignore

Tatooine is sparsely populated. If the homing trace is correct, I will find them quickly, Master.

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Maul's voice wasn't changed to make him sound less British. It was changed because, gods love him but Ray Park's voice sounds kind of silly.

 

That's why Ray's favourte roll he played was Snake Eyes in the GI Joe movie; not only did he never speak, but it was a life-long dream for him.

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Steve Valentine didn't voice the Sith Warrior, hard to believe because it sounds just like him, just like hard to believe the Bounty Hunter isn't Steve Blum, but Bioware used different voice actors.

 

What? Steve Blum is most definitely the Bounty Hunter VA.

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I'd say James Earl Jones' voice was pretty imposing, as was Darth Malak's.

 

Palpatine was played by a British actor but you'll notice that when he's in his guise as the ambitious yet good hearted and caring senator/supreme chancellor, he speaks in his normal British accent. However when he more fully becomes Darth Sidious, he downplays his accent, using an "American accent", and sounds more imposing that way.

 

Remember that Darth Vader and Darth Maul were both physically portrayed by English actors/stuntmen, but both had their voices replaced to sound more evil and imposing. Most notably James Earl Jones being cast as Vader.

 

There is a subconscious association in American culture that has persisted since the Revolutionary war that British things are effeminate and/or pompous. Things like men drinking tea (some men do drink tea but it is not nearly as popular of a beverage among American men as it is men in other parts of the world), and the accent. During the build up to, and course of the Revolutionary war, there was a lot of hate towards anything British, and people connected these British things, like tea, to the British soldiers, who, fumbled about in the rugged American wilderness, and in doing so, looked inept and less "manly" to American militias. It's a subconscious cultural thing that at this point, many Americans still recognize these associations but don't know why, they don't know the historical context.

 

So when David Prowse was acting as Lord Vader on set, saying the lines, the American members of the cast and crew had trouble taking the villain seriously, because of his mild mannered British accent. Carrie Fisher referred to him as "Darth Farmer".

 

So.. raised in the US.. I hear a British accent, I think "pompous" before I can even consciously recognize it, and it doesn't make for an imposing villain.

 

The British have a hard time sounding 'intimidating', but they do /very/ well at sounding 'sinister'. Which is why the accent worked so well for a Grand Moff, but not for Prowse's Darth Farmer.

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The British have a hard time sounding 'intimidating', but they do /very/ well at sounding 'sinister'. Which is why the accent worked so well for a Grand Moff, but not for Prowse's Darth Farmer.

 

Right, which is why the accent fails for a Sith Warrior but is okay for Sith Sorcerer.

 

Not going back a page to multi-quote, but Steve Blum does NOT voice the Male bounty hunter. The actual voice actor is shown in the game's credits, it's Tom Spackman

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What is this, I don't even...

 

I suppose your highschool History teacher would be proud of this answer, but no. Just no.

 

I see nothing accurate in this, except for the idea that some modern Americans today might view the British that way, which you are apparently an example of.

 

Why do you think modern Americans view British that way? It's a 250 year old prejudice and most people can't even determine why. But it makes sense when you put in the historical events of the Revolutionary war, and the Boston Tea Party.

 

The Americans conducted Guerilla warfare in the wildnerness, the British were used to "gentleman's warfare" and didn't fare as well in the wildnerness. That comes across as effeminate, even as biased of a view as it was.

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